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Archive for December, 2011

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Filed under Climate Change, Climate Justice, Corporate Globalization

Article source: GJEP Climate Connections Blog

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Article source: GJEP Climate Connections Blog

Note:  A lot of people thought the Sea Shepherds’ campaign last year against the corporate Japanese whaling fleet shut them down for good in their illegal attempt to kill whales.  They were run off last year by the Sea Shepherds, but the corporate elite will do what they can get by with to make money; including the slaughter of whales in the protected Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary. The confrontations between the Sea Shepherds and the corporate Japanese whaling fleet receive tremendous media coverage in Aotearoa (New Zealand), Australia and Japan. -The GJEP Team

Steve Irwin Responding to Distress Call from the Brigitte Bardot

December 28, 2011

Brigitte Bardot in the Mediterranean. photo: Michelle McCarron

While fighting heavy seas in pursuit of the Japanese whaling fleet, the Sea Shepherd scout vessel Brigitte Bardot was struck by a rogue wave that has cracked the hull and severely damaged one of the pontoons on the vessel.

Captain Paul Watson, onboard the Sea Shepherd flagship Steve Irwin,reports that they are fighting heavy seas to reach the position of theBrigitte Bardot some 240 miles to the southeast. It is expected to take twenty hours to reach the damaged vessel.

The Brigitte Bardot is at 51 degrees 42 minutes South and 99 Degrees 21 minutes East, or 1500 miles southwest of Fremantle, Western Australia.

Brigitte Bardot Captain Jonathan Miles Renecle of South Africa was pursuing the Japanese factory ship Nisshin Maru in six meter swells when the wave slammed into the port side of the vessel cracking the hull. The crack has been getting wider as the seas continue to pound the vessel.

Captain Renecle is confident that the ship will stay afloat until the Steve Irwin arrives. The Brigitte Bardot has a crew of ten: three British, three American, one Australian, one Canadian, one Belgian and one South African.

The Sea Shepherd ship Bob Barker will continue in pursuit of the whaling fleet. The Steve Irwin will assist theBrigitte Bardot, first to see to the safety of the crew, and then to escort the vessel to Fremantle for repairs.

“This is disappointing but these are hostile seas and we have always been prepared for situations like this,” Said Captain Paul Watson from the Steve Irwin. “Right now the safety of my crew on the Brigitte Bardot is our priority and we intend to reach the crew and then do what we can to save our ship.”

Check the Sea Shepherd online for continued updates

For background information courtesy the BBC:

Article source: GJEP Climate Connections Blog

Note:  A lot of people thought the Sea Shepherds’ campaign last year against the corporate Japanese whaling fleet shut them down for good in their illegal attempt to kill whales.  They were run off last year by the Sea Shepherds, but the corporate elite will do what they can get by with to make money; including the slaughter of whales in the protected Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary. The confrontations between the Sea Shepherds and the corporate Japanese whaling fleet receive tremendous media coverage in Aotearoa (New Zealand), Australia and Japan. -The GJEP Team

Steve Irwin Responding to Distress Call from the Brigitte Bardot

December 28, 2011

Brigitte Bardot in the Mediterranean. photo: Michelle McCarron

While fighting heavy seas in pursuit of the Japanese whaling fleet, the Sea Shepherd scout vessel Brigitte Bardot was struck by a rogue wave that has cracked the hull and severely damaged one of the pontoons on the vessel.

Captain Paul Watson, onboard the Sea Shepherd flagship Steve Irwin,reports that they are fighting heavy seas to reach the position of theBrigitte Bardot some 240 miles to the southeast. It is expected to take twenty hours to reach the damaged vessel.

The Brigitte Bardot is at 51 degrees 42 minutes South and 99 Degrees 21 minutes East, or 1500 miles southwest of Fremantle, Western Australia.

Brigitte Bardot Captain Jonathan Miles Renecle of South Africa was pursuing the Japanese factory ship Nisshin Maru in six meter swells when the wave slammed into the port side of the vessel cracking the hull. The crack has been getting wider as the seas continue to pound the vessel.

Captain Renecle is confident that the ship will stay afloat until the Steve Irwin arrives. The Brigitte Bardot has a crew of ten: three British, three American, one Australian, one Canadian, one Belgian and one South African.

The Sea Shepherd ship Bob Barker will continue in pursuit of the whaling fleet. The Steve Irwin will assist theBrigitte Bardot, first to see to the safety of the crew, and then to escort the vessel to Fremantle for repairs.

“This is disappointing but these are hostile seas and we have always been prepared for situations like this,” Said Captain Paul Watson from the Steve Irwin. “Right now the safety of my crew on the Brigitte Bardot is our priority and we intend to reach the crew and then do what we can to save our ship.”

Check the Sea Shepherd online for continued updates

For background information courtesy the BBC:

The palmoil industry says: Orangutans are pests!


This orangutan’s mother was killed in one of palm oil plantations

Dear friends of the rainforest,

the BBC reports that orangutans are treated as “pest” and exterminated on Indonesian and Malaysian palm oil plantations. In the last year alone, up to 1,800 orangutans were killed in Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo).

They wander hungry through the plantations as though in a daze, looking for food and thus eat the palm seedlings. Palm oil plantation workers are paid to kill orangutans either before a forest is cleared or, if they see any in a plantation. Either way, it is totally illegal to harass, harm or kill any orangutans.

Please write to the Malaysian Palm Oil Council and protest with your signature against the slaughter of orangutans:

Take Action

Many thanks and best regards,

David Vollrath

Rainforest Rescue (Rettet den Regenwald e.V.)

info@rainforest-rescue.org
www.rainforest-rescue.org
http://www.facebook.com/rainforest2rescue

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Article source: GJEP Climate Connections Blog

1 Comment

Filed under Bioenergy / Agrofuels, Climate Change, Climate Justice, Energy, False Solutions to Climate Change, Food Sovereignty, Forests and Climate Change, GE Trees

Article source: GJEP Climate Connections Blog

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Filed under Bioenergy / Agrofuels, Climate Change, Climate Justice, Energy, False Solutions to Climate Change, Food Sovereignty, Forests and Climate Change, GE Trees

Note:  We just received this from our friend and colleague, Lidy Nacpil.  We worked with Lidy in Durban and other UN climate conferences in the past, plus World Bank issues.  Lidy is from the Philippines.-The GJEP Team

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Please find below JSAPMDD’s Appeal for Solidarity for Victims of Typhoon Sendong in Mindanao, Philippines.

———————————————————————

Appeal for Solidarity for Victims of Typhoon in Mindanao, Philippines

The Jubilee South Asia Pacific Movement on Debt and Development (JSAPMDD) appeals to the international community for support to the victims of Typhoon Sendong that hit the southern part of the Philippines last December 16, 2011.

Just a week before the Christmas holidays, villages were swept away by flash floods and landslides as Typhoon Sendong struck provinces in Northern Mindanao and unleashed more than a month’s worth of rainfall in 12 hours.

The hardest hit are the cities of Cagayan de Oro and Iligan. Nearly 1,500 people were reported to have been killed.  As of December 20, 2011, the national disaster agency reports that more than 338,000 people in 13 provinces were affected, with almost 43,000 still in evacuation centers such as schools, churches and gymnasiums.  Around 10,000 houses were damaged, of which a third were ruined. More than $340,000 worth of crops were also damaged.

We demand governments of rich industrialized countries to provide finance as part of climate debt reparations. We also urge the international civil society community to send assistance, whether in cash or in kind, to ease the burden and suffering of the victims of this climate catastrophe.

Donations can be coursed through our member organizations in Mindanao, the Freedom from Debt Coalition – West Mindanao Chapter and GITIB. Please send donations to:

Freedom from Debt Coalition – West Mindanao Chapter

Contact Person: Lucita Gonzales or Lourdes Anabieza

Tel. No.: (6388)5213771

Email: fdcwestminda@yahoo.com

or

GITIB

Contact Person: Roldan Gonzales or Naome Medina

Tel. No.: (6388)5212168

Email: gitib2001@yahoo.com

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Article source: GJEP Climate Connections Blog

Note:  We just received this from our friend and colleague, Lidy Nacpil.  We worked with Lidy in Durban and other UN climate conferences in the past, plus World Bank issues.  Lidy is from the Philippines.-The GJEP Team

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Please find below JSAPMDD’s Appeal for Solidarity for Victims of Typhoon Sendong in Mindanao, Philippines.

———————————————————————

Appeal for Solidarity for Victims of Typhoon in Mindanao, Philippines

The Jubilee South Asia Pacific Movement on Debt and Development (JSAPMDD) appeals to the international community for support to the victims of Typhoon Sendong that hit the southern part of the Philippines last December 16, 2011.

Just a week before the Christmas holidays, villages were swept away by flash floods and landslides as Typhoon Sendong struck provinces in Northern Mindanao and unleashed more than a month’s worth of rainfall in 12 hours.

The hardest hit are the cities of Cagayan de Oro and Iligan. Nearly 1,500 people were reported to have been killed.  As of December 20, 2011, the national disaster agency reports that more than 338,000 people in 13 provinces were affected, with almost 43,000 still in evacuation centers such as schools, churches and gymnasiums.  Around 10,000 houses were damaged, of which a third were ruined. More than $340,000 worth of crops were also damaged.

We demand governments of rich industrialized countries to provide finance as part of climate debt reparations. We also urge the international civil society community to send assistance, whether in cash or in kind, to ease the burden and suffering of the victims of this climate catastrophe.

Donations can be coursed through our member organizations in Mindanao, the Freedom from Debt Coalition – West Mindanao Chapter and GITIB. Please send donations to:

Freedom from Debt Coalition – West Mindanao Chapter

Contact Person: Lucita Gonzales or Lourdes Anabieza

Tel. No.: (6388)5213771

Email: fdcwestminda@yahoo.com

or

GITIB

Contact Person: Roldan Gonzales or Naome Medina

Tel. No.: (6388)5212168

Email: gitib2001@yahoo.com

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A resident runs on a flooded stairway as floodwater pours into an underground garage amid heavy rainfalls in Chengdu, Sichuan province in this July 3, 2011 file photo. Credit: Reuters/China Daily/Files

Cross-posted from Reuters -Tue Dec 27, 2011

(Reuters) – From floods that crippled countries, to mega cyclones, huge blizzards, killer tornadoes to famine-inducing droughts, 2011 has been another record-breaker for bad weather.

While it is too early to predict what 2012 will be like, insurers and weather prediction agencies point to a clear trend: the world’s weather is becoming more extreme and more costly.

Following are details of major weather disasters for 2011 and some early forecasts for 2012.

2011 OVERVIEW

Global reinsurer Munich Re says natural catastrophe losses for the first nine months of 2011 totalled $310 billion, a record, with 80 percent of all economic losses occurring in the Asia-Pacific region. Since 1980, weather-related disasters globally have more than tripled.

The United States set a record with 12 separate billion-dollar weather disasters in 2011, with an aggregate damage total of approximately $52 billion, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said this month.

The U.N.’s World Meteorological Organization said global temperatures in 2011 are currently the 10th highest on record, higher than any previous year with a La Nina event, which has a relative cooling influence.

The 13 warmest years have all occurred in the 15 years since 1997. The extent of Arctic sea ice in 2011 was the second lowest on record, and its volume was the lowest.

Scientists say a warming atmosphere and more moisture in the air are providing fuel for weather systems, leading to more extremes. Rising levels of greenhouse gases from industry, transport and deforestation are providing that extra heat.

MAJOR WEATHER DISASTERS OF 2011

January — Record floods swamp Australia’s east coast, killing 35 people, shutting coal mines, wiping out roads, rail lines and thousands of homes and costing more than $2 billion in insured losses.

– “Snowmageddon”: Heavy snows blanket large parts of the United States including record falls in New York.

February — Cyclone Yasi, one of the largest and most powerful storms ever to hit Australia, strikes northern Queensland state, devastating sugar and banana crops.

– Massive winter storm hits U.S. Midwest and Northeast, causing travel chaos and power outages.

April – Series of tornadoes batter U.S. Southeast, killing an estimated 364 people.

May – Tornado hits U.S. town of Joplin, killing about 160 people, the single deadliest U.S. twister since 1947.

– Floods in U.S. Midwest and Mississippi River Valley inundate millions of acres, trimming corn and soy plantings.

June – Floods in China’s central and southern provinces kill more than 100 people. More than half a million are evacuated.

July – Worst drought in decades in the Horn of Africa triggers famine in Somalia and leaves 13 million people at risk starvation in a crisis expected to last well into 2012.

– Flooding between July and late November in Thailand kills more than 600, affects a third of the country, causes damage of at least $42 billion and inundates nearly 1,000 factories near Bangkok, disrupting auto and electronics global supply chains.

August – Hurricane Irene kills at least 40 people in the eastern United States and triggers the worst flooding in decades in some states. Economic losses estimated to top $10 billion.

September – Scores die in worst flooding along the Mekong river since 2000.

October – Rare October snowstorm kills 13 in U.S. northeast and leaves 1.6 million without power.

December – Tropical storm Washi hits the Philippine island of Mindanao, triggering flash floods and mudslides and killing more than 1,200 people.

– Year-long drought in U.S. state of Texas causes more than $5 billion in agricultural losses and triggers wildfires that burn 4 million acres (1.6 million hectares). Summer temperatures in Texas break U.S. records.

PREDICTIONS FOR 2012

A La Nina event in the Pacific Ocean is expected to last well into 2012. The phenomenon is a cooling of waters in the central Pacific and has a global impact on weather.

Forecasters expect it to bring above-average rains to northern and eastern Australia and more cyclones than normal during the Australian November-April storm season. La Nina events also tend to strengthen the Atlantic hurricane season.

Colorado State University researchers expect an above-average hurricane season if conditions that bring warmer than usual tropical water temperatures in the Atlantic continue and there no major El Nino event.

El Nino is a warming of surface waters in the eastern and central Pacific, affecting wind patterns that can trigger droughts in Australia and suppress Atlantic hurricanes.

Winter across Europe and the United States is also expected to be milder, forecasters say.

“The common thread this winter compared to last is the presence of La Nina,” said Chris Vaccaro, public affairs director, at the National Weather Service in Washington. “But the La Nina we have now and through the winter is not anticipated to be as strong as last year.”

In addition, the Arctic Oscillation, which was negative last year and sent frigid air southward leading to huge snowstorms, has largely been positive this year. The oscillation is a shift in atmospheric pressure cells that changes wind patterns.

A negative phase triggers high pressure over the Arctic and low pressure at mid-latitudes, which makes the Arctic zone relatively warm, but spills cold Arctic air southward to places like the U.S. Midwest and Northeast.

Most of continental Europe, the Nordic region and Britain will see warmer-than-normal weather between January and March, Weather Services International (WSI.L) said last week. (Sources: Reuters, NOAA, WMO, Colorado State University) (Additional reporting by Nina Chestney in London and Timothy Gardner in Washington; Writing by David Fogarty; Editing by Ron Popeski)

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Article source: GJEP Climate Connections Blog

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Filed under Carbon Trading, Climate Change, Climate Justice, Corporate Globalization, Energy, Water

Article source: GJEP Climate Connections Blog

From Friends of the Earth (Australia)

26 December 2011

With three dead and nine critically injured, questions are being raised about the role of Australian owned company Arc Exploration after a community protest on the island of Sumbawa was attacked by Indonesian police.

“The shooting of peaceful protestors is completely unacceptable anywhere in the world, but with an Australian company involved because of its mining operation, it is imperative that the Australian Government step-in immediately to help calm the situation and ensure no more people are killed” said Derec Davies of Friends of the Earth Australia.

“Foreign Minister Rudd must respond and investigate the role of Arc Exploration and its dealings with the Indonesian National Police, which has responded so violently against the peaceful protest at the Sape Harbor over the Bima Gold Mine project.”

“Indonesian police attacked on Christmas Eve, and three days later, questions and concerns from locals go unanswered.”

It is unfortunate that after the police shootings, protestors responded by taking up weapons and petrol bombs. Sadly however the video footage by local media shows unarmed protestors being shot by security forces. While the Indonesian Government has said it will ‘evaluate’ the police response, it is clear that the police exceeded the use of necessary force to calm the situation. Their actions have inflamed the situation.

“Friends of the Earth is a global organisation and we work with local communities to support their peaceful non violent environmental struggles. We are appalled by the response of the Indonesian police”.

“The community was protesting against environmental damage caused by the mine. No Australian company should be complicit in any way in this level of violence. It is unacceptable in Australia and shouldn’t be acceptable in Indonesia,” said Davies.

“Many tourists to Bali visit the island of Sumbawa. The company has been a trusted partner of locals. But with the problems of the Bima gold mine that trust has turned to outrage. The locals of Bima demand more, and so should Australians of our companies operating in the area”.

“Foreign Minister Rudd must step in now and call a halt to Australian operations of Arc Exploration in the Bima area. Halting the mine operations will allow police to pull out and calm to settle. Foreign Minister Rudd is responsible for calling on Chairman Mr Bruce Watson to explain his companies involvement. Australian shareholders have the right to know what is going on” said Mr Davies.

“The first killings were on Christmas eve, yet the ‘battle of Bima’ continues. The current violent response is at Pelabuhan Sape Bima. The community is outnumbered by heavily armed national police, which is being supported by the military.”

“During this time of holiday peace, we call upon Arc Exploration to halt operations and the Australian Government to intervene to halt the unnecessary and forceful action”.

Further reading: “Australian-owned mine sparks deadly protests” 702 ABC Sydney (ABC/Reuters)

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Article source: GJEP Climate Connections Blog

From Friends of the Earth (Australia)

26 December 2011

With three dead and nine critically injured, questions are being raised about the role of Australian owned company Arc Exploration after a community protest on the island of Sumbawa was attacked by Indonesian police.

“The shooting of peaceful protestors is completely unacceptable anywhere in the world, but with an Australian company involved because of its mining operation, it is imperative that the Australian Government step-in immediately to help calm the situation and ensure no more people are killed” said Derec Davies of Friends of the Earth Australia.

“Foreign Minister Rudd must respond and investigate the role of Arc Exploration and its dealings with the Indonesian National Police, which has responded so violently against the peaceful protest at the Sape Harbor over the Bima Gold Mine project.”

“Indonesian police attacked on Christmas Eve, and three days later, questions and concerns from locals go unanswered.”

It is unfortunate that after the police shootings, protestors responded by taking up weapons and petrol bombs. Sadly however the video footage by local media shows unarmed protestors being shot by security forces. While the Indonesian Government has said it will ‘evaluate’ the police response, it is clear that the police exceeded the use of necessary force to calm the situation. Their actions have inflamed the situation.

“Friends of the Earth is a global organisation and we work with local communities to support their peaceful non violent environmental struggles. We are appalled by the response of the Indonesian police”.

“The community was protesting against environmental damage caused by the mine. No Australian company should be complicit in any way in this level of violence. It is unacceptable in Australia and shouldn’t be acceptable in Indonesia,” said Davies.

“Many tourists to Bali visit the island of Sumbawa. The company has been a trusted partner of locals. But with the problems of the Bima gold mine that trust has turned to outrage. The locals of Bima demand more, and so should Australians of our companies operating in the area”.

“Foreign Minister Rudd must step in now and call a halt to Australian operations of Arc Exploration in the Bima area. Halting the mine operations will allow police to pull out and calm to settle. Foreign Minister Rudd is responsible for calling on Chairman Mr Bruce Watson to explain his companies involvement. Australian shareholders have the right to know what is going on” said Mr Davies.

“The first killings were on Christmas eve, yet the ‘battle of Bima’ continues. The current violent response is at Pelabuhan Sape Bima. The community is outnumbered by heavily armed national police, which is being supported by the military.”

“During this time of holiday peace, we call upon Arc Exploration to halt operations and the Australian Government to intervene to halt the unnecessary and forceful action”.

Further reading: “Australian-owned mine sparks deadly protests” 702 ABC Sydney (ABC/Reuters)

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From Friends of the Earth (Australia)

26 December 2011

With three dead and nine critically injured, questions are being raised about the role of Australian owned company Arc Exploration after a community protest on the island of Sumbawa was attacked by Indonesian police.

“The shooting of peaceful protestors is completely unacceptable anywhere in the world, but with an Australian company involved because of its mining operation, it is imperative that the Australian Government step-in immediately to help calm the situation and ensure no more people are killed” said Derec Davies of Friends of the Earth Australia.

“Foreign Minister Rudd must respond and investigate the role of Arc Exploration and its dealings with the Indonesian National Police, which has responded so violently against the peaceful protest at the Sape Harbor over the Bima Gold Mine project.”

“Indonesian police attacked on Christmas Eve, and three days later, questions and concerns from locals go unanswered.”

It is unfortunate that after the police shootings, protestors responded by taking up weapons and petrol bombs. Sadly however the video footage by local media shows unarmed protestors being shot by security forces. While the Indonesian Government has said it will ‘evaluate’ the police response, it is clear that the police exceeded the use of necessary force to calm the situation. Their actions have inflamed the situation.

“Friends of the Earth is a global organisation and we work with local communities to support their peaceful non violent environmental struggles. We are appalled by the response of the Indonesian police”.

“The community was protesting against environmental damage caused by the mine. No Australian company should be complicit in any way in this level of violence. It is unacceptable in Australia and shouldn’t be acceptable in Indonesia,” said Davies.

“Many tourists to Bali visit the island of Sumbawa. The company has been a trusted partner of locals. But with the problems of the Bima gold mine that trust has turned to outrage. The locals of Bima demand more, and so should Australians of our companies operating in the area”.

“Foreign Minister Rudd must step in now and call a halt to Australian operations of Arc Exploration in the Bima area. Halting the mine operations will allow police to pull out and calm to settle. Foreign Minister Rudd is responsible for calling on Chairman Mr Bruce Watson to explain his companies involvement. Australian shareholders have the right to know what is going on” said Mr Davies.

“The first killings were on Christmas eve, yet the ‘battle of Bima’ continues. The current violent response is at Pelabuhan Sape Bima. The community is outnumbered by heavily armed national police, which is being supported by the military.”

“During this time of holiday peace, we call upon Arc Exploration to halt operations and the Australian Government to intervene to halt the unnecessary and forceful action”.

Further reading: “Australian-owned mine sparks deadly protests” 702 ABC Sydney (ABC/Reuters)

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