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Our friends at The Center for Food Safety issued a press release earlier this week calling out the USDA and the biotech industry on its failed policies to protect farms and the ecosystem from contamination from GE crops.

Center for Food Safety calls coexistence a failed policy, demands moratorium on open-air field trials- photo courtesy CFS

Center for Food Safety calls “coexistence” a failed policy, demands moratorium on open-air field trials- photo courtesy CFS

 

Center For Food Safety Press Release

September 26, 2014 (Washington, DC)–The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced that experimental genetically engineered (GE) wheat was discovered in July, 2014 at a Montana research facility that has not legally grown the variety since 2003.
“Once again, USDA and the biotech industry have put farmers and the food supply at risk,” said Andrew Kimbrell, executive director for Center for Food Safety. “Coexistence between GE and non-GE crops is a failed policy that fundamentally cannot work. Genetic contamination is a serious threat to farmers across the country.”
In the same announcement, USDA closed its investigation into a May, 2013 GE wheat contamination episode in Oregon without any explanation for the incident. That contamination episode led to closures of vital export markets and a class action lawsuit against Monsanto by wheat farmers.
“Just as USDA closes one fruitless investigation, it tries to bury the story of yet another contamination. USDA cannot keep treating these as isolated incidents; contamination is the inevitable outcome of GE crop technology,” said Kimbrell. “It’s time for Congress to take definitive action.”

Read the whole press release here

 

Our friends at The Center for Food Safety issued a press release earlier this week calling out the USDA and the biotech industry on its failed policies to protect farms and the ecosystem from contamination from GE crops.

Center for Food Safety calls coexistence a failed policy, demands moratorium on open-air field trials- photo courtesy CFS

Center for Food Safety calls “coexistence” a failed policy, demands moratorium on open-air field trials- photo courtesy CFS

 

Center For Food Safety Press Release

September 26, 2014 (Washington, DC)–The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced that experimental genetically engineered (GE) wheat was discovered in July, 2014 at a Montana research facility that has not legally grown the variety since 2003.
“Once again, USDA and the biotech industry have put farmers and the food supply at risk,” said Andrew Kimbrell, executive director for Center for Food Safety. “Coexistence between GE and non-GE crops is a failed policy that fundamentally cannot work. Genetic contamination is a serious threat to farmers across the country.”
In the same announcement, USDA closed its investigation into a May, 2013 GE wheat contamination episode in Oregon without any explanation for the incident. That contamination episode led to closures of vital export markets and a class action lawsuit against Monsanto by wheat farmers.
“Just as USDA closes one fruitless investigation, it tries to bury the story of yet another contamination. USDA cannot keep treating these as isolated incidents; contamination is the inevitable outcome of GE crop technology,” said Kimbrell. “It’s time for Congress to take definitive action.”

Read the whole press release here

 

Our friends at The Center for Food Safety issued a press release earlier this week calling out the USDA and the biotech industry on its failed policies to protect farms and the ecosystem from contamination from GE crops.

Center for Food Safety calls coexistence a failed policy, demands moratorium on open-air field trials- photo courtesy CFS

Center for Food Safety calls “coexistence” a failed policy, demands moratorium on open-air field trials- photo courtesy CFS

 

Center For Food Safety Press Release

September 26, 2014 (Washington, DC)–The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced that experimental genetically engineered (GE) wheat was discovered in July, 2014 at a Montana research facility that has not legally grown the variety since 2003.
“Once again, USDA and the biotech industry have put farmers and the food supply at risk,” said Andrew Kimbrell, executive director for Center for Food Safety. “Coexistence between GE and non-GE crops is a failed policy that fundamentally cannot work. Genetic contamination is a serious threat to farmers across the country.”
In the same announcement, USDA closed its investigation into a May, 2013 GE wheat contamination episode in Oregon without any explanation for the incident. That contamination episode led to closures of vital export markets and a class action lawsuit against Monsanto by wheat farmers.
“Just as USDA closes one fruitless investigation, it tries to bury the story of yet another contamination. USDA cannot keep treating these as isolated incidents; contamination is the inevitable outcome of GE crop technology,” said Kimbrell. “It’s time for Congress to take definitive action.”

Read the whole press release here

 

During the successful campaign by Mexican beekeepers to keep Monsanto soybeans out of Yucatan, Greenpeace activists and Mayans formed a human chain to spell out the words ma ogm, which translates as no gmo (genetically modified organisms). Photograph: Arturo Rocha/Greenpeace via The Guardian

During the successful campaign by Mexican beekeepers to keep Monsanto soybeans out of Yucatan, Greenpeace activists and Mayans formed a human chain to spell out the words ‘ma ogm’, which translates as ‘no gmo’ (genetically modified organisms). Photograph: Arturo Rocha/Greenpeace via The Guardian

This story was sent to us from a longtime supporter and ally who offered succinct and trenchant context for it:  “Troubles with acceptance in the U.S…..Europe…..Hey!…..Why not force the issue on Mexico? It’s a mad, mad world.”

The center for GMO corn could very well be part of Monsanto’s push into Mexico, which has already been fought back by farmers and other members of the public there (see photo above and story attached to it).

But, note the real weirdness here in messaging: Monsanto is calling this a “global” center and claims that the goal of the center is to create new corn crops that can handle the “diseases and stresses….caused by global climate change.” Really? Monsanto comes to rescue again: Just ask the farmers in India, Brazil or Iowa how grateful they already are! I think they’d say that they’re busy enough fighting the diseases and stresses caused by Monsanto.

MEXICO CITY, Sept 29 (Reuters) – Global seed technology giant Monsanto said on Monday it has launched a global center in Mexico for developing new hybrid and genetically modified strains of corn, part of the company’s push to boost output of the planet’s most widely produced grain.

The center, based in Tlajomulco de Zuniga on the southern fringe of the western city of Guadalajara, will be used to centralize development of Monsanto’s corn seed research, mainly for the U.S. market, the company said.

“The aim is to create new varieties tolerant to diseases and the stresses that affect maize cultivation all over the world due to growing negative conditions caused by global climate change,” the company said in a statement.

Read the whole article here! 

 

Photo taken at Flood Wall Street by Rachel Smolker.

Photo taken at Flood Wall Street by Rachel Smolker.

Rachel Smolker, co-director of Biofuelwatch and an organizer with Energy Justice Network, wrote this excellent essay reflecting on the proposals from the UN Climate Summit and the events in NYC around the summit, which include everything from the Climate March to a private sector lunch where the CEO of Saudi gas company Aramco announced a new “Oil and Gas Climate Initiative.”

Smolker draws on her years of work fighting false solutions to climate change to put the most recent proposals into sharp perspective.

Corporations Are Not Going to Save Us From Climate Disruption
By Rachel Smolker, Truthout. September 29, 2014.

This past week in New York saw some remarkable actions around climate change. The massive People’s Climate March was perhaps the main media spectacle, but it was not the only, or necessarily the most important event. Another important one: the Climate Justice Summit, which featured the voices and testimonials of people all around the country and the globe who are on the frontlines, bearing the brunt of both ruthless extraction and destruction of their lands and livelihoods, and also experiencing most directly the impacts of climate change itself. Many were tearful as they described lives and lands laid to ruin by tar sands, fracking, coal, uranium mining and more. The brutal, relentless and rapacious greed of corporate profiteers in the fossil fuel industries, big agribusiness and forestry and financial sectors seems almost unfathomable.

Read the whole article here.

Photo taken at Flood Wall Street by Rachel Smolker.

Photo taken at Flood Wall Street by Rachel Smolker.

Rachel Smolker, co-director of Biofuelwatch and an organizer with Energy Justice Network, wrote this excellent essay reflecting on the proposals from the UN Climate Summit and the events in NYC around the summit, which include everything from the Climate March to a private sector lunch where the CEO of Saudi gas company Aramco announced a new “Oil and Gas Climate Initiative.”

Smolker draws on her years of work fighting false solutions to climate change to put the most recent proposals into sharp perspective.

Corporations Are Not Going to Save Us From Climate Disruption
By Rachel Smolker, Truthout. September 29, 2014.

This past week in New York saw some remarkable actions around climate change. The massive People’s Climate March was perhaps the main media spectacle, but it was not the only, or necessarily the most important event. Another important one: the Climate Justice Summit, which featured the voices and testimonials of people all around the country and the globe who are on the frontlines, bearing the brunt of both ruthless extraction and destruction of their lands and livelihoods, and also experiencing most directly the impacts of climate change itself. Many were tearful as they described lives and lands laid to ruin by tar sands, fracking, coal, uranium mining and more. The brutal, relentless and rapacious greed of corporate profiteers in the fossil fuel industries, big agribusiness and forestry and financial sectors seems almost unfathomable.

Read the whole article here.

Photo taken at Flood Wall Street by Rachel Smolker.

Photo taken at Flood Wall Street by Rachel Smolker.

Rachel Smolker, co-director of Biofuelwatch and an organizer with Energy Justice Network, wrote this excellent essay reflecting on the proposals from the UN Climate Summit and the events in NYC around the summit, which include everything from the Climate March to a private sector lunch where the CEO of Saudi gas company Aramco announced a new “Oil and Gas Climate Initiative.”

Smolker draws on her years of work fighting false solutions to climate change to put the most recent proposals into sharp perspective.

Corporations Are Not Going to Save Us From Climate Disruption
By Rachel Smolker, Truthout. September 29, 2014.

This past week in New York saw some remarkable actions around climate change. The massive People’s Climate March was perhaps the main media spectacle, but it was not the only, or necessarily the most important event. Another important one: the Climate Justice Summit, which featured the voices and testimonials of people all around the country and the globe who are on the frontlines, bearing the brunt of both ruthless extraction and destruction of their lands and livelihoods, and also experiencing most directly the impacts of climate change itself. Many were tearful as they described lives and lands laid to ruin by tar sands, fracking, coal, uranium mining and more. The brutal, relentless and rapacious greed of corporate profiteers in the fossil fuel industries, big agribusiness and forestry and financial sectors seems almost unfathomable.

Read the whole article here.

Here’s a set of articles and videos highlighting the key role played by Indigenous organizers, many good friends of GJEP’s, in critiques leading up to and coming out of the Climate events of last week.

First, Indigenous Rising posted a video of Kandi Mossett, Climate Campaign organizer for Indigenous Environmental Network, describing her experience within the UN Climate Summit and her frustration at the lack of urgency in world leaders and at how even the few members of civil society allowed in were sidelined. “The planet is going to go on with or without us. It’s up to us to decide if we’re going to be here or not.”

Next , Idle No More Media posted a great video of Indigenous people who participated in Flood Wall Street, including Clayton Thomas-Muller speaking to the crowd: “Indigenous People have a sacred gift to share with the movement of climate justice.”

Moreover, two recent essays on the events featured Mossett and Thomas-Muller. In The Villager, Sarah Ferguson wrote about her exuberance attending the Global Climate Convergence.

While the media focused on the spectacle of 400,000-plus bodies jammed along Central Park West as far as the eye could see, it was the networking that took place between all these grassroots groups and the connections made at events leading up to the march that gave it its real power.

Scores of workshops and gatherings were held in East Village community gardens and other parts of Lower Manhattan as part of the New York City Climate Convergence — which coincided with the annual Lower East Side Harvest festival — creating a synergy of art, music and activism that I haven’t experienced here for some time.

Later, I listened to Native women tell powerful and heart-wrenching stories of resisting frack operations in tribal lands in Canada and the U.S. at a jam-packed symposium at the New School called #Frack Off.

Kandi Mossett, an activist from the Fort Berthold Reservation in the Badlands of North Dakota, showed slides of natural gas being flared off oil rigs in the Bakken Shale Play.

“Where I live, they’re fracking for oil,” Mossett explained. “The gas that’s on top of the oil is just a byproduct because the pipeline infrastructure to capture it currently does not exist.

“Every day more than 100 cubic feet of natural gas is flared away,” Mossett continued. “Just to put it into perspective, that’s enough gas to heat half a million homes.”

Finally, Clayton Thomas-Muller was quoted in an interesting article by Aljazeera America on the juxtaposition (split or bridge?) between the Climate March and Flood Wall Street. He notes on social media that Aljazeera mistakenly identifies his as a primary organizer for FWS rather than part of the media team, but this shows the key role he played that day.

“I think the march represented a mainstream-ifying of a different kind of social movement,” said Clayton Thomas-Muller, one of the primary organizers of the Flood Wall Street protests. “The march represented a fundamental shift. There’s been a popularization of the ability to debate the climate and capitalism.”

FAIR (Fairness Accuracy in Reporting) has a weekly radio show called Counterspin.  The program reaches 150 noncommercial stations across the United States and Canada. This week Global Justice Ecology Project’s Anne Petermann was one one of the guests. She spoke about her experiences at UN Climate Conventions between 2004 and 2011.

“The UN has worked hard to squeeze civil society and grassroots voices out of the dialogue and process,” she said.  “The UN has demonstrated time and time again that they have no interest in what grassroots voices have to say. There is no way that corporate dominated government is going to make any difference with climate change.” “Direct action, directly confronting the powers that are oppressing us and destroying the environment and taking power in our own hands is how we force change and force the transformation that we need.”

She also spoke about her and others concerns that the People’s Climate March did not have strong overarching demands, and some of the groups at the table included industry,- bankers, Goldman Sachs, Duke Energy, and others that promote corporate profiteering as a part of corporate campaign on climate change strategies.

When asked about the other groups and voices that joined the giant march, she said “I was also very happy to see a broad diversity of approaches and voices that were truly grassroots groups calling for transformation and not just reform. Confronting the false solutions and the false voices that are out there is, especially with climate change is encouraging.”

 

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

 

Counterspin with guest Anne Petermann   Listen to the whole interview here.

 

 

FAIR (Fairness Accuracy in Reporting) has a weekly radio show called Counterspin.  The program reaches 150 noncommercial stations across the United States and Canada. This week Global Justice Ecology Project’s Anne Petermann was one one of the guests. She spoke about her experiences at UN Climate Conventions between 2004 and 2011.

“The UN has worked hard to squeeze civil society and grassroots voices out of the dialogue and process,” she said.  “The UN has demonstrated time and time again that they have no interest in what grassroots voices have to say. There is no way that corporate dominated government is going to make any difference with climate change.” “Direct action, directly confronting the powers that are oppressing us and destroying the environment and taking power in our own hands is how we force change and force the transformation that we need.”

She also spoke about her and others concerns that the People’s Climate March did not have strong overarching demands, and some of the groups at the table included industry,- bankers, Goldman Sachs, Duke Energy, and others that promote corporate profiteering as a part of corporate campaign on climate change strategies.

When asked about the other groups and voices that joined the giant march, she said “I was also very happy to see a broad diversity of approaches and voices that were truly grassroots groups calling for transformation and not just reform. Confronting the false solutions and the false voices that are out there is, especially with climate change is encouraging.”

 

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

 

Counterspin with guest Anne Petermann   Listen to the whole interview here.

 

 

FAIR (Fairness Accuracy in Reporting) has a weekly radio show called Counterspin.  The program reaches 150 noncommercial stations across the United States and Canada. This week Global Justice Ecology Project’s Anne Petermann was one one of the guests. She spoke about her experiences at UN Climate Conventions between 2004 and 2011.

“The UN has worked hard to squeeze civil society and grassroots voices out of the dialogue and process,” she said.  “The UN has demonstrated time and time again that they have no interest in what grassroots voices have to say. There is no way that corporate dominated government is going to make any difference with climate change.” “Direct action, directly confronting the powers that are oppressing us and destroying the environment and taking power in our own hands is how we force change and force the transformation that we need.”

She also spoke about her and others concerns that the People’s Climate March did not have strong overarching demands, and some of the groups at the table included industry,- bankers, Goldman Sachs, Duke Energy, and others that promote corporate profiteering as a part of corporate campaign on climate change strategies.

When asked about the other groups and voices that joined the giant march, she said “I was also very happy to see a broad diversity of approaches and voices that were truly grassroots groups calling for transformation and not just reform. Confronting the false solutions and the false voices that are out there is, especially with climate change is encouraging.”

 

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

 

Counterspin with guest Anne Petermann   Listen to the whole interview here.

 

 

FAIR (Fairness Accuracy in Reporting) has a weekly radio show called Counterspin.  The program reaches 150 noncommercial stations across the United States and Canada. This week Global Justice Ecology Project’s Anne Petermann was one one of the guests. She spoke about her experiences at UN Climate Conventions between 2004 and 2011.

“The UN has worked hard to squeeze civil society and grassroots voices out of the dialogue and process,” she said.  “The UN has demonstrated time and time again that they have no interest in what grassroots voices have to say. There is no way that corporate dominated government is going to make any difference with climate change.” “Direct action, directly confronting the powers that are oppressing us and destroying the environment and taking power in our own hands is how we force change and force the transformation that we need.”

She also spoke about her and others concerns that the People’s Climate March did not have strong overarching demands, and some of the groups at the table included industry,- bankers, Goldman Sachs, Duke Energy, and others that promote corporate profiteering as a part of corporate campaign on climate change strategies.

When asked about the other groups and voices that joined the giant march, she said “I was also very happy to see a broad diversity of approaches and voices that were truly grassroots groups calling for transformation and not just reform. Confronting the false solutions and the false voices that are out there is, especially with climate change is encouraging.”

 

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

 

Counterspin with guest Anne Petermann   Listen to the whole interview here.

 

 

FAIR (Fairness Accuracy in Reporting) has a weekly radio show called Counterspin.  The program reaches 150 noncommercial stations across the United States and Canada. This week Global Justice Ecology Project’s Anne Petermann was one one of the guests. She spoke about her experiences at UN Climate Conventions between 2004 and 2011.

“The UN has worked hard to squeeze civil society and grassroots voices out of the dialogue and process,” she said.  “The UN has demonstrated time and time again that they have no interest in what grassroots voices have to say. There is no way that corporate dominated government is going to make any difference with climate change.” “Direct action, directly confronting the powers that are oppressing us and destroying the environment and taking power in our own hands is how we force change and force the transformation that we need.”

She also spoke about her and others concerns that the People’s Climate March did not have strong overarching demands, and some of the groups at the table included industry,- bankers, Goldman Sachs, Duke Energy, and others that promote corporate profiteering as a part of corporate campaign on climate change strategies.

When asked about the other groups and voices that joined the giant march, she said “I was also very happy to see a broad diversity of approaches and voices that were truly grassroots groups calling for transformation and not just reform. Confronting the false solutions and the false voices that are out there is, especially with climate change is encouraging.”

 

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

 

Counterspin with guest Anne Petermann   Listen to the whole interview here.

 

 

FAIR (Fairness Accuracy in Reporting) has a weekly radio show called Counterspin.  The program reaches 150 noncommercial stations across the United States and Canada. This week Global Justice Ecology Project’s Anne Petermann was one one of the guests. She spoke about her experiences at UN Climate Conventions between 2004 and 2011.

“The UN has worked hard to squeeze civil society and grassroots voices out of the dialogue and process,” she said.  “The UN has demonstrated time and time again that they have no interest in what grassroots voices have to say. There is no way that corporate dominated government is going to make any difference with climate change.” “Direct action, directly confronting the powers that are oppressing us and destroying the environment and taking power in our own hands is how we force change and force the transformation that we need.”

She also spoke about her and others concerns that the People’s Climate March did not have strong overarching demands, and some of the groups at the table included industry,- bankers, Goldman Sachs, Duke Energy, and others that promote corporate profiteering as a part of corporate campaign on climate change strategies.

When asked about the other groups and voices that joined the giant march, she said “I was also very happy to see a broad diversity of approaches and voices that were truly grassroots groups calling for transformation and not just reform. Confronting the false solutions and the false voices that are out there is, especially with climate change is encouraging.”

 

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

 

Counterspin with guest Anne Petermann   Listen to the whole interview here.

 

 

FAIR (Fairness Accuracy in Reporting) has a weekly radio show called Counterspin.  The program reaches 150 noncommercial stations across the United States and Canada. This week Global Justice Ecology Project’s Anne Petermann was one one of the guests. She spoke about her experiences at UN Climate Conventions between 2004 and 2011.

“The UN has worked hard to squeeze civil society and grassroots voices out of the dialogue and process,” she said.  “The UN has demonstrated time and time again that they have no interest in what grassroots voices have to say. There is no way that corporate dominated government is going to make any difference with climate change.” “Direct action, directly confronting the powers that are oppressing us and destroying the environment and taking power in our own hands is how we force change and force the transformation that we need.”

She also spoke about her and others concerns that the People’s Climate March did not have strong overarching demands, and some of the groups at the table included industry,- bankers, Goldman Sachs, Duke Energy, and others that promote corporate profiteering as a part of corporate campaign on climate change strategies.

When asked about the other groups and voices that joined the giant march, she said “I was also very happy to see a broad diversity of approaches and voices that were truly grassroots groups calling for transformation and not just reform. Confronting the false solutions and the false voices that are out there is, especially with climate change is encouraging.”

 

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

Anne Petermann of the Global Justice Ecology Project addresses Plenary Session Climate Convergence Conference, 19 September 2014

 

Counterspin with guest Anne Petermann   Listen to the whole interview here.