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Elders and other resisters addressed the Energy East TransCanada Pipeline “Open House” at Kenora, Ontario on August 12 and the people told Energy East to go away. This beautiful article from Reclaim Turtle Island tells he story in words and video.  These brave people will move you.

 

Elder Nancy Morrison addresses Kenora, Ontario TransCanada/East Energy Open House, august 2014 - Photo Crystal Greene

Elder Nancy Morrison addresses Kenora, Ontario TransCanada/East Energy Open House, august 2014 – Photo Crystal Greene

 

Anishinaabeg loudly oppose TransCanada’s Energy East project at Kenora open house

CRYSTAL GREENE  Reclaim Turtle Island

Anishinaabeg and fellow Energy East pipeline resisters made a presence inside and outside Lakeside Inn on Tuesday, Aug. 12 for TransCanada’s second Kenora, Ont., open house

This time, the people weren’t interested in hearing TransCanada’s “information session” pitch. The tradeshow set-up had booths, corporate fact-sheets, and enough staff for one-on-one interactions to keep concerned citizens unaware of each other’s objections to the proposed Energy East pipeline.

Many in attendance had already made up their minds against the Energy East project proposal to convert the 50+ year-old natural gas carrying “Canadian Mainline,” and build new pipeline sections, into what could be North America’s largest tarsands pipeline, with 1.1 million barrels of diluted bitumen per-day from Hardisty, AB to marine terminals at Saint John, NB for international export.

Read and view the full piece here

Elders and other resisters addressed the Energy East TransCanada Pipeline “Open House” at Kenora, Ontario on August 12 and the people told Energy East to go away. This beautiful article from Reclaim Turtle Island tells he story in words and video.  These brave people will move you.

 

Elder Nancy Morrison addresses Kenora, Ontario TransCanada/East Energy Open House, august 2014 - Photo Crystal Greene

Elder Nancy Morrison addresses Kenora, Ontario TransCanada/East Energy Open House, august 2014 – Photo Crystal Greene

 

Anishinaabeg loudly oppose TransCanada’s Energy East project at Kenora open house

CRYSTAL GREENE  Reclaim Turtle Island

Anishinaabeg and fellow Energy East pipeline resisters made a presence inside and outside Lakeside Inn on Tuesday, Aug. 12 for TransCanada’s second Kenora, Ont., open house

This time, the people weren’t interested in hearing TransCanada’s “information session” pitch. The tradeshow set-up had booths, corporate fact-sheets, and enough staff for one-on-one interactions to keep concerned citizens unaware of each other’s objections to the proposed Energy East pipeline.

Many in attendance had already made up their minds against the Energy East project proposal to convert the 50+ year-old natural gas carrying “Canadian Mainline,” and build new pipeline sections, into what could be North America’s largest tarsands pipeline, with 1.1 million barrels of diluted bitumen per-day from Hardisty, AB to marine terminals at Saint John, NB for international export.

Read and view the full piece here

Elders and other resisters addressed the Energy East TransCanada Pipeline “Open House” at Kenora, Ontario on August 12 and the people told Energy East to go away. This beautiful article from Reclaim Turtle Island tells he story in words and video.  These brave people will move you.

 

Elder Nancy Morrison addresses Kenora, Ontario TransCanada/East Energy Open House, august 2014 - Photo Crystal Greene

Elder Nancy Morrison addresses Kenora, Ontario TransCanada/East Energy Open House, august 2014 – Photo Crystal Greene

 

Anishinaabeg loudly oppose TransCanada’s Energy East project at Kenora open house

CRYSTAL GREENE  Reclaim Turtle Island

Anishinaabeg and fellow Energy East pipeline resisters made a presence inside and outside Lakeside Inn on Tuesday, Aug. 12 for TransCanada’s second Kenora, Ont., open house

This time, the people weren’t interested in hearing TransCanada’s “information session” pitch. The tradeshow set-up had booths, corporate fact-sheets, and enough staff for one-on-one interactions to keep concerned citizens unaware of each other’s objections to the proposed Energy East pipeline.

Many in attendance had already made up their minds against the Energy East project proposal to convert the 50+ year-old natural gas carrying “Canadian Mainline,” and build new pipeline sections, into what could be North America’s largest tarsands pipeline, with 1.1 million barrels of diluted bitumen per-day from Hardisty, AB to marine terminals at Saint John, NB for international export.

Read and view the full piece here

Elders and other resisters addressed the Energy East TransCanada Pipeline “Open House” at Kenora, Ontario on August 12 and the people told Energy East to go away. This beautiful article from Reclaim Turtle Island tells he story in words and video.  These brave people will move you.

 

Elder Nancy Morrison addresses Kenora, Ontario TransCanada/East Energy Open House, august 2014 - Photo Crystal Greene

Elder Nancy Morrison addresses Kenora, Ontario TransCanada/East Energy Open House, august 2014 – Photo Crystal Greene

 

Anishinaabeg loudly oppose TransCanada’s Energy East project at Kenora open house

CRYSTAL GREENE  Reclaim Turtle Island

Anishinaabeg and fellow Energy East pipeline resisters made a presence inside and outside Lakeside Inn on Tuesday, Aug. 12 for TransCanada’s second Kenora, Ont., open house

This time, the people weren’t interested in hearing TransCanada’s “information session” pitch. The tradeshow set-up had booths, corporate fact-sheets, and enough staff for one-on-one interactions to keep concerned citizens unaware of each other’s objections to the proposed Energy East pipeline.

Many in attendance had already made up their minds against the Energy East project proposal to convert the 50+ year-old natural gas carrying “Canadian Mainline,” and build new pipeline sections, into what could be North America’s largest tarsands pipeline, with 1.1 million barrels of diluted bitumen per-day from Hardisty, AB to marine terminals at Saint John, NB for international export.

Read and view the full piece here

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Filed under Actions / Protest, Climate Justice, Earth Radio, Earth Watch, Uncategorized

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Filed under Actions / Protest, Climate Justice, Earth Radio, Earth Watch, Uncategorized

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Filed under Actions / Protest, Climate Justice, Earth Radio, Earth Watch, Uncategorized

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Filed under Actions / Protest, Climate Justice, Earth Radio, Earth Watch, Uncategorized

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Filed under Biodiversity, Climate Change, Energy, False Solutions to Climate Change, GE Trees, Genetic Engineering, Green Economy, Greenwashing, Industrial agriculture, Land Grabs, Uncategorized

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Filed under Biodiversity, Climate Change, Energy, False Solutions to Climate Change, GE Trees, Genetic Engineering, Green Economy, Greenwashing, Industrial agriculture, Land Grabs, Uncategorized

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Filed under Biodiversity, Climate Change, Energy, False Solutions to Climate Change, GE Trees, Genetic Engineering, Green Economy, Greenwashing, Industrial agriculture, Land Grabs, Uncategorized

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Filed under Biodiversity, Climate Change, Energy, False Solutions to Climate Change, GE Trees, Genetic Engineering, Green Economy, Greenwashing, Industrial agriculture, Land Grabs, Uncategorized

An article in the Halifax Media Co-op outlines how chemicals used to clean up oil spills can be just as deadly to marine life as the oil itself. The idea of using harsh chemicals to clean up a chemical spill leaves us wondering: What are they trying to save if Corexit and other dispersants remove oil, but still cause damage?

Of course, if we stopped relying so much on fossil fuels, stopped drilling in areas with fragile ecosystems, stopped drilling period… we wouldn’t even have this issue to begin with.

Oil from the Deepwater Horizon explosion poured into the Gulf of Mexico for nearly three months before the well was finally capped. Photo: Office of the Governor of the State of Louisiana

Oil from the Deepwater Horizon explosion poured into the U.S. Gulf of Mexico for nearly three months before the well was finally capped. Photo: Office of the Governor of the State of Louisiana

Making it go away: oilspills, corexit and Nova Scotia’s offshore

by Robert Devet, Halifax Media Co-op, August 11, 2014

K’JIPUKTUK (Halifax) – A chemical known as corexit 9500 will be the main line of defense if an oilspill occurs once Shell starts drilling exploratory wells offshore of Nova Scotia.

This becomes clear from Shell’s Environmental Impact Statement that is winding its way through the federal approval process

Corexit, and other dispersants like it, are used to dissolve oilspills. It contains chemicals that break up the oil into tiny droplets that sink so they can be degraded by bacteria.

Critics say that the chemical kills marine life and makes people sick.

These same critics also argue that dispersants merely hide the effects of spills. Fewer visuals of birds covered in oil, but the trade-off are clouds of miniscule oil droplets floating below the ocean’s surface and settling on the ocean bottom.

Read the full article here.

An article in the Halifax Media Co-op outlines how chemicals used to clean up oil spills can be just as deadly to marine life as the oil itself. The idea of using harsh chemicals to clean up a chemical spill leaves us wondering: What are they trying to save if Corexit and other dispersants remove oil, but still cause damage?

Of course, if we stopped relying so much on fossil fuels, stopped drilling in areas with fragile ecosystems, stopped drilling period… we wouldn’t even have this issue to begin with.

Oil from the Deepwater Horizon explosion poured into the Gulf of Mexico for nearly three months before the well was finally capped. Photo: Office of the Governor of the State of Louisiana

Oil from the Deepwater Horizon explosion poured into the U.S. Gulf of Mexico for nearly three months before the well was finally capped. Photo: Office of the Governor of the State of Louisiana

Making it go away: oilspills, corexit and Nova Scotia’s offshore

by Robert Devet, Halifax Media Co-op, August 11, 2014

K’JIPUKTUK (Halifax) – A chemical known as corexit 9500 will be the main line of defense if an oilspill occurs once Shell starts drilling exploratory wells offshore of Nova Scotia.

This becomes clear from Shell’s Environmental Impact Statement that is winding its way through the federal approval process

Corexit, and other dispersants like it, are used to dissolve oilspills. It contains chemicals that break up the oil into tiny droplets that sink so they can be degraded by bacteria.

Critics say that the chemical kills marine life and makes people sick.

These same critics also argue that dispersants merely hide the effects of spills. Fewer visuals of birds covered in oil, but the trade-off are clouds of miniscule oil droplets floating below the ocean’s surface and settling on the ocean bottom.

Read the full article here.

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Filed under Actions / Protest, Bioenergy / Agrofuels, Carbon Trading, Climate Change, Climate Justice, Corporate Globalization, Energy, False Solutions to Climate Change, Fracking, Green Economy, Industrial agriculture, Media, Occupy Wall Street, Politics, Posts from Anne Petermann, Uncategorized