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17 December, 2014 Crestwood Protest  photo courtesy We Are Seneca Lake

17 December, 2014 Seneca Lake/Crestwood Protest photo courtesy “We Are Seneca Lake”

Yesterday, as New York State released the long awaited Public Health Assessment  on the impacts of fracking, and as Governor Cuomo dramatically announced that High Volume Hydrolaugic Hydrofracking (fracking) in New York State is banned, actions and arrests continue at Seneca Lake. Yesterday as the Governor spoke, 28 Seneca Lake defenders were arrested. Just the day before, 41 arrests were made.

As regular readers of Climate Connections know, Seneca Lake and the Finger Lakes areas of New York are under siege by those in industry that are trying to turn the region into a transportation and storage hub for natural gas.

Crestwood Midstream, a Houston-based energy company, is creating extremely dangerous facilities in, around, and under Seneca Lake, including using abandoned salt mines for the energy hub. This project threatens the environment, drinking water, health and well-being of millions of people, including future generations. The negative regional economic impact will be devastating to local farms including many family-owned grape and wine operations.

We call on Governor Cuomo to put a halt to this project immediately and permanently. Be clear Governor Cuomo, we are willing to put our bodies and our lives on the line and we will fill the local jails with grandparents, children, neighbors, health workers, veterans, and the so many others that are defenders of our lands, our health, and our future. We are Seneca Lake. All of us.

Please consider making a donation to the We Are Seneca Lake Jail Fund.

 

More photos thanks to Citizen Journalists like you!

Protest at Seneca Lake 17 December 2014  Photo courtesy We are Seneca Lake

Protest at Seneca Lake 17 December 2014 Photo courtesy “We are Seneca Lake”

16 December 2014  Protest by teachers at Seneca Lake  photo courtesy We are Seneca Lake

16 December 2014 Protest by teachers at Seneca Lake photo courtesy “We are Seneca Lake”

Civil Disobedience turns to arrest. We will not give up.  17 December 2014 Photo Courtesy We are Seneca Lake

Civil Disobedience turns to arrest. “We will not give up”. 17 December 2014 Photo Courtesy We are Seneca Lake

Sandra Steingraber at We are Seneca Lake action 17, December 2014. Photo Courtesy We are Seneca Lake

Sandra Steingraber at We are Seneca Lake action 17, December 2014. Photo Courtesy We are Seneca Lake

Photo Courtesy We are Seneca Lake 17 December 2014

Photo Courtesy We are Seneca Lake 17 December 2014

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.


Citizen journalism is making a big difference in this age of the internet. Individuals can and have documented and circulated events including police murders, demonstrations, military actions, and beautiful things.

Cuteness aside, citizen journalists are a great threat to corporate media in that often, citizens can act independently of cultivated sources that are the corporate or mainstream media reporters, editors, and producers. Make no mistake, sometimes those cultivated sources are very productive. But we would not have the kind of documentation of things like the police murder of Eric Garner in New York City if it wasn’t for a citizen with the cell phone camera, recording it on video and sending it out for the world to see.

We at Climate Connections recognize that being a citizen journalist is not easy, nor is it always safe. However, as a citizen of the planet, we urge you to think of what your role could be, should you come face to face with an event that could be and or should be documented.

Be aware however, that in all cases and in all places you do not have the same rights as a “registered reporter with a known news agency.”  In the coming weeks, I will be posting resources that will help you to understand your rights, understand how to use citizen journalism, and help you understand how this contributes to a more just society.

We are pleased to provide a link to an important story by friend and colleague Mike Niman, published by our newest Buffalo New York newspaper – The Public.

Citizen Journalists: We Couldn’t Do it Without You

Michael I Niman, The Public. 9 December 2014

Now that the whole world is talking about racist police violence in the United States, can we acknowledge that this problem is not new, that it goes back to the founding of the country as a slave state? That police have traditionally played a role for the majority of our history first enforcing slavery and later segregation? The only thing new here is that most of our media is finally showing some outrage about judicially sanctioned and institutionalized violence against black Americans—five centuries after slavery came to American soil. This includes a minute in the 1960s when Yankee media condemned Southern racism while giving the violence of Northern segregation a pass for another 50 years.

Read the whole article

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.


Citizen journalism is making a big difference in this age of the internet. Individuals can and have documented and circulated events including police murders, demonstrations, military actions, and beautiful things.

Cuteness aside, citizen journalists are a great threat to corporate media in that often, citizens can act independently of cultivated sources that are the corporate or mainstream media reporters, editors, and producers. Make no mistake, sometimes those cultivated sources are very productive. But we would not have the kind of documentation of things like the police murder of Eric Garner in New York City if it wasn’t for a citizen with the cell phone camera, recording it on video and sending it out for the world to see.

We at Climate Connections recognize that being a citizen journalist is not easy, nor is it always safe. However, as a citizen of the planet, we urge you to think of what your role could be, should you come face to face with an event that could be and or should be documented.

Be aware however, that in all cases and in all places you do not have the same rights as a “registered reporter with a known news agency.”  In the coming weeks, I will be posting resources that will help you to understand your rights, understand how to use citizen journalism, and help you understand how this contributes to a more just society.

We are pleased to provide a link to an important story by friend and colleague Mike Niman, published by our newest Buffalo New York newspaper – The Public.

Citizen Journalists: We Couldn’t Do it Without You

Michael I Niman, The Public. 9 December 2014

Now that the whole world is talking about racist police violence in the United States, can we acknowledge that this problem is not new, that it goes back to the founding of the country as a slave state? That police have traditionally played a role for the majority of our history first enforcing slavery and later segregation? The only thing new here is that most of our media is finally showing some outrage about judicially sanctioned and institutionalized violence against black Americans—five centuries after slavery came to American soil. This includes a minute in the 1960s when Yankee media condemned Southern racism while giving the violence of Northern segregation a pass for another 50 years.

Read the whole article

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.


Citizen journalism is making a big difference in this age of the internet. Individuals can and have documented and circulated events including police murders, demonstrations, military actions, and beautiful things.

Cuteness aside, citizen journalists are a great threat to corporate media in that often, citizens can act independently of cultivated sources that are the corporate or mainstream media reporters, editors, and producers. Make no mistake, sometimes those cultivated sources are very productive. But we would not have the kind of documentation of things like the police murder of Eric Garner in New York City if it wasn’t for a citizen with the cell phone camera, recording it on video and sending it out for the world to see.

We at Climate Connections recognize that being a citizen journalist is not easy, nor is it always safe. However, as a citizen of the planet, we urge you to think of what your role could be, should you come face to face with an event that could be and or should be documented.

Be aware however, that in all cases and in all places you do not have the same rights as a “registered reporter with a known news agency.”  In the coming weeks, I will be posting resources that will help you to understand your rights, understand how to use citizen journalism, and help you understand how this contributes to a more just society.

We are pleased to provide a link to an important story by friend and colleague Mike Niman, published by our newest Buffalo New York newspaper – The Public.

Citizen Journalists: We Couldn’t Do it Without You

Michael I Niman, The Public. 9 December 2014

Now that the whole world is talking about racist police violence in the United States, can we acknowledge that this problem is not new, that it goes back to the founding of the country as a slave state? That police have traditionally played a role for the majority of our history first enforcing slavery and later segregation? The only thing new here is that most of our media is finally showing some outrage about judicially sanctioned and institutionalized violence against black Americans—five centuries after slavery came to American soil. This includes a minute in the 1960s when Yankee media condemned Southern racism while giving the violence of Northern segregation a pass for another 50 years.

Read the whole article

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.


Citizen journalism is making a big difference in this age of the internet. Individuals can and have documented and circulated events including police murders, demonstrations, military actions, and beautiful things.

Cuteness aside, citizen journalists are a great threat to corporate media in that often, citizens can act independently of cultivated sources that are the corporate or mainstream media reporters, editors, and producers. Make no mistake, sometimes those cultivated sources are very productive. But we would not have the kind of documentation of things like the police murder of Eric Garner in New York City if it wasn’t for a citizen with the cell phone camera, recording it on video and sending it out for the world to see.

We at Climate Connections recognize that being a citizen journalist is not easy, nor is it always safe. However, as a citizen of the planet, we urge you to think of what your role could be, should you come face to face with an event that could be and or should be documented.

Be aware however, that in all cases and in all places you do not have the same rights as a “registered reporter with a known news agency.”  In the coming weeks, I will be posting resources that will help you to understand your rights, understand how to use citizen journalism, and help you understand how this contributes to a more just society.

We are pleased to provide a link to an important story by friend and colleague Mike Niman, published by our newest Buffalo New York newspaper – The Public.

Citizen Journalists: We Couldn’t Do it Without You

Michael I Niman, The Public. 9 December 2014

Now that the whole world is talking about racist police violence in the United States, can we acknowledge that this problem is not new, that it goes back to the founding of the country as a slave state? That police have traditionally played a role for the majority of our history first enforcing slavery and later segregation? The only thing new here is that most of our media is finally showing some outrage about judicially sanctioned and institutionalized violence against black Americans—five centuries after slavery came to American soil. This includes a minute in the 1960s when Yankee media condemned Southern racism while giving the violence of Northern segregation a pass for another 50 years.

Read the whole article

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.


Citizen journalism is making a big difference in this age of the internet. Individuals can and have documented and circulated events including police murders, demonstrations, military actions, and beautiful things.

Cuteness aside, citizen journalists are a great threat to corporate media in that often, citizens can act independently of cultivated sources that are the corporate or mainstream media reporters, editors, and producers. Make no mistake, sometimes those cultivated sources are very productive. But we would not have the kind of documentation of things like the police murder of Eric Garner in New York City if it wasn’t for a citizen with the cell phone camera, recording it on video and sending it out for the world to see.

We at Climate Connections recognize that being a citizen journalist is not easy, nor is it always safe. However, as a citizen of the planet, we urge you to think of what your role could be, should you come face to face with an event that could be and or should be documented.

Be aware however, that in all cases and in all places you do not have the same rights as a “registered reporter with a known news agency.”  In the coming weeks, I will be posting resources that will help you to understand your rights, understand how to use citizen journalism, and help you understand how this contributes to a more just society.

We are pleased to provide a link to an important story by friend and colleague Mike Niman, published by our newest Buffalo New York newspaper – The Public.

Citizen Journalists: We Couldn’t Do it Without You

Michael I Niman, The Public. 9 December 2014

Now that the whole world is talking about racist police violence in the United States, can we acknowledge that this problem is not new, that it goes back to the founding of the country as a slave state? That police have traditionally played a role for the majority of our history first enforcing slavery and later segregation? The only thing new here is that most of our media is finally showing some outrage about judicially sanctioned and institutionalized violence against black Americans—five centuries after slavery came to American soil. This includes a minute in the 1960s when Yankee media condemned Southern racism while giving the violence of Northern segregation a pass for another 50 years.

Read the whole article

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.

Photo by GJEP campaigner Ruddy Turnstone at Flood Wall Street, 21 September 2014 as the people wash pepper spray out of their eyes.


Citizen journalism is making a big difference in this age of the internet. Individuals can and have documented and circulated events including police murders, demonstrations, military actions, and beautiful things.

Cuteness aside, citizen journalists are a great threat to corporate media in that often, citizens can act independently of cultivated sources that are the corporate or mainstream media reporters, editors, and producers. Make no mistake, sometimes those cultivated sources are very productive. But we would not have the kind of documentation of things like the police murder of Eric Garner in New York City if it wasn’t for a citizen with the cell phone camera, recording it on video and sending it out for the world to see.

We at Climate Connections recognize that being a citizen journalist is not easy, nor is it always safe. However, as a citizen of the planet, we urge you to think of what your role could be, should you come face to face with an event that could be and or should be documented.

Be aware however, that in all cases and in all places you do not have the same rights as a “registered reporter with a known news agency.”  In the coming weeks, I will be posting resources that will help you to understand your rights, understand how to use citizen journalism, and help you understand how this contributes to a more just society.

We are pleased to provide a link to an important story by friend and colleague Mike Niman, published by our newest Buffalo New York newspaper – The Public.

Citizen Journalists: We Couldn’t Do it Without You

Michael I Niman, The Public. 9 December 2014

Now that the whole world is talking about racist police violence in the United States, can we acknowledge that this problem is not new, that it goes back to the founding of the country as a slave state? That police have traditionally played a role for the majority of our history first enforcing slavery and later segregation? The only thing new here is that most of our media is finally showing some outrage about judicially sanctioned and institutionalized violence against black Americans—five centuries after slavery came to American soil. This includes a minute in the 1960s when Yankee media condemned Southern racism while giving the violence of Northern segregation a pass for another 50 years.

Read the whole article

First_Rail_15-12-11


Newcastle, Australia: A peaceful blockade has halted the first train load of coal coming from the controversial Maules Creek coal mine on its way to Newcastle’s Kooragang Island coal export terminals this morning.

A group of 22 people met the train this morning. Eight people have occupied and stopped the train and are refusing to leave.

20141215_061108-e1418609338604The train was stopped during the night and delayed for over 6 hours by a protestor who locked onto locomotives needed to push the coal over the Great Dividing Range. The 58 year-old protestor, Bruce, from Northern Rivers, was arrested. Speaking about why he took action, Bruce said:

“Australia’s response to climate change is headed completely backwards. If we can stop this new coal mine we set a precedent for the rest of Australia to stand up.”

Jonathan Moylan from Frontline Action on Coal said, “Over the last twelve months, hundreds of people have been arrested slowing down construction of the Maules Creek mine. The fate of our country, and people everywhere, depends on coal being left in the ground. In the absence of leadership from the industry or the Government to shut down coal exports and prevent dangerous climate change, ordinary people have taken extraordinary action to stop this mine.

“A growing number of people are standing up to the coal industry’s plans to ship increasing volumes of coal and fuel dangerous climate change. Doctors, people of faith, IPCC scientists and earlier this month, former Wallabies captain David Pocock, have all taken action to halt construction at Maules Creek. Even Malcolm Fraser last week tweeted about Maules Creek, referring to the coal sector as an ‘industry of a past age’.

Local Newcastle mother, Vanessa Wiebford said, “I want my daughter to have a future without the horror of extreme heat and fire, and uncertain water and food production. I am bitterly disappointed in Australia’s political leadership and their unthinking support for expanded coal exports at a time when we’re already seeing alarming signs of dangerous climate change.

“If they’re not going to act to prevent this, then all parents have a duty to risk arrest to try and stop it ourselves.”

2014 is now expected to break the record as the hottest year in Australia’s history. Heatwave conditions were observed in many parts of the country during our hottest spring on record this year, and the Bureau of Meteorology is predicting a return to El Nino conditions at a time when much of Queensland and parts of New South Wales are already drought declared.

The burning of coal exported from Australia is this country’s biggest single contribution to climate change, and production and export of coal increased in the last 12 months.

“With the international climate negotiations in Lima failing to deliver the scale of action needed, people around the world will next year have to take their future into their own hands like never before. Ordinary people are stepping up to do what it takes to stop the fossil fuel industry’s dangerous expansion plans,” said Moylan.

 

When Dr. Theo Colburn published “Our Stolen Future” in 1996 it was a Rachel Carson level revelation.  The book, co-authored by Dianne Dumanoski and John Myers, exposed the devastating depth to which our economic system promotes the creation and distribution of human-made deadly chemicals – for profit.  The poisons exist in virtually all products.  This book changed my life.

Yesterday, 15 December 2014, Dr. Colburn passed away at the age of 87. You may remember her for this pivotal book, or her excellent project TEDX- The Endocrine Disruption Exchange, which for many of us has been an essential resource. She may be best remembered for her work on banning BPA from plastic bottles, including baby bottles and toys. She is one of our great heroes. Simply put Theodora Colburn saved a lot of lives. Her substantial legacy will always help us and future generations to recover our stolen future.

Dr. Colburn courtesy Julie Dermansky/Earthworks  2014

Dr. Theo Colburn, courtesy Julie Dermansky/Earthworks 2014

Her friends at TEDX released the following message this morning:

Theo Colburn, 1927-2014

If you ever had the chance to meet her, even once, you knew Theo Colborn. She didn’t have a single hidden agenda. Her commitment to uncovering the truth was out there for the world to see.

For nearly 30 years she dedicated herself to revealing the dangers of endocrine disrupting chemicals to wildlife and humans. More recently she alerted us all to the threats posed by chemicals associated with oil and gas development. She wove the two together beautifully in her statement The Fossil Fuel Connection, which she worked on until the day she died.

Theo’s visionary leadership and passion shone most brilliantly when she made direct connections between new ideas, scientists whose work confirmed them, impacted individuals, and people in positions to change what needed changing. She will be remembered for many generations to come, generations that she worked tirelessly to protect.

Theo often feared that we had already passed the tipping point — that our intelligence and compassion had been so compromised by endocrine disruptors that we could no longer think our way out of the crises we had created.

As the living embodiment of her legacy, we at TEDX say, “No. It is not too late. There are people out there who ‘get it’ and who care — a lot of people — and we won’t let you down Theo.”

An excellent article published today at GRIST:

Remembering the genius who got BPA out of your water bottles, and so much more

Heather Smith GRIST  16 December 2014

 

From Mother Jones:

Theo Colburn, a controversial scientist speaks on plastics, IQ, and the womb

Marilyn Berlin Snell  Mother Jones March/April 1998

 

 

 

 

When Dr. Theo Colburn published “Our Stolen Future” in 1996 it was a Rachel Carson level revelation.  The book, co-authored by Dianne Dumanoski and John Myers, exposed the devastating depth to which our economic system promotes the creation and distribution of human-made deadly chemicals – for profit.  The poisons exist in virtually all products.  This book changed my life.

Yesterday, 15 December 2014, Dr. Colburn passed away at the age of 87. You may remember her for this pivotal book, or her excellent project TEDX- The Endocrine Disruption Exchange, which for many of us has been an essential resource. She may be best remembered for her work on banning BPA from plastic bottles, including baby bottles and toys. She is one of our great heroes. Simply put Theodora Colburn saved a lot of lives. Her substantial legacy will always help us and future generations to recover our stolen future.

Dr. Colburn courtesy Julie Dermansky/Earthworks  2014

Dr. Theo Colburn, courtesy Julie Dermansky/Earthworks 2014

Her friends at TEDX released the following message this morning:

Theo Colburn, 1927-2014

If you ever had the chance to meet her, even once, you knew Theo Colborn. She didn’t have a single hidden agenda. Her commitment to uncovering the truth was out there for the world to see.

For nearly 30 years she dedicated herself to revealing the dangers of endocrine disrupting chemicals to wildlife and humans. More recently she alerted us all to the threats posed by chemicals associated with oil and gas development. She wove the two together beautifully in her statement The Fossil Fuel Connection, which she worked on until the day she died.

Theo’s visionary leadership and passion shone most brilliantly when she made direct connections between new ideas, scientists whose work confirmed them, impacted individuals, and people in positions to change what needed changing. She will be remembered for many generations to come, generations that she worked tirelessly to protect.

Theo often feared that we had already passed the tipping point — that our intelligence and compassion had been so compromised by endocrine disruptors that we could no longer think our way out of the crises we had created.

As the living embodiment of her legacy, we at TEDX say, “No. It is not too late. There are people out there who ‘get it’ and who care — a lot of people — and we won’t let you down Theo.”

An excellent article published today at GRIST:

Remembering the genius who got BPA out of your water bottles, and so much more

Heather Smith GRIST  16 December 2014

 

From Mother Jones:

Theo Colburn, a controversial scientist speaks on plastics, IQ, and the womb

Marilyn Berlin Snell  Mother Jones March/April 1998

 

 

 

 

When Dr. Theo Colburn published “Our Stolen Future” in 1996 it was a Rachel Carson level revelation.  The book, co-authored by Dianne Dumanoski and John Myers, exposed the devastating depth to which our economic system promotes the creation and distribution of human-made deadly chemicals – for profit.  The poisons exist in virtually all products.  This book changed my life.

Yesterday, 15 December 2014, Dr. Colburn passed away at the age of 87. You may remember her for this pivotal book, or her excellent project TEDX- The Endocrine Disruption Exchange, which for many of us has been an essential resource. She may be best remembered for her work on banning BPA from plastic bottles, including baby bottles and toys. She is one of our great heroes. Simply put Theodora Colburn saved a lot of lives. Her substantial legacy will always help us and future generations to recover our stolen future.

Dr. Colburn courtesy Julie Dermansky/Earthworks  2014

Dr. Theo Colburn, courtesy Julie Dermansky/Earthworks 2014

Her friends at TEDX released the following message this morning:

Theo Colburn, 1927-2014

If you ever had the chance to meet her, even once, you knew Theo Colborn. She didn’t have a single hidden agenda. Her commitment to uncovering the truth was out there for the world to see.

For nearly 30 years she dedicated herself to revealing the dangers of endocrine disrupting chemicals to wildlife and humans. More recently she alerted us all to the threats posed by chemicals associated with oil and gas development. She wove the two together beautifully in her statement The Fossil Fuel Connection, which she worked on until the day she died.

Theo’s visionary leadership and passion shone most brilliantly when she made direct connections between new ideas, scientists whose work confirmed them, impacted individuals, and people in positions to change what needed changing. She will be remembered for many generations to come, generations that she worked tirelessly to protect.

Theo often feared that we had already passed the tipping point — that our intelligence and compassion had been so compromised by endocrine disruptors that we could no longer think our way out of the crises we had created.

As the living embodiment of her legacy, we at TEDX say, “No. It is not too late. There are people out there who ‘get it’ and who care — a lot of people — and we won’t let you down Theo.”

An excellent article published today at GRIST:

Remembering the genius who got BPA out of your water bottles, and so much more

Heather Smith GRIST  16 December 2014

 

From Mother Jones:

Theo Colburn, a controversial scientist speaks on plastics, IQ, and the womb

Marilyn Berlin Snell  Mother Jones March/April 1998

 

 

 

 

shutterstock via grist article linked below

Shutterstock via Grist article linked below

So, shockingly, nature again won’t do what we want.

A new study challenges hopes that tropical rainforest trees will grow faster with rising CO2 and mitigate climate change.

The study concludes that the “widespread assumption of a Co2-induced stimulation of tropical tree growth may not be valid.” The authors focused on tree rings, and it’s possible that added growth might be in new trees or in other parts besides the trunk, making for increased density, but it still puts the brakes on one line of wishful thinking.

Forests, of course, play an important role in the balancing our carbon, among innumerable other things, but there’s obvious limits.

Rhett Butler, in his mongabay.com article yesterday, ‘Growth of forests not keeping pace with rising CO2 levels,’ quoted one of the authors of the study on its possible implications:

Our results are important for the IPCC predictions, which underpin international climate policy,” said first author Peter van der Sleen. “Almost all models made so far assume that CO2 stimulates tree growth in the tropics. In this way, tropical forests can function as carbon sinks. They intercept, as it were, a part of the extra CO2. Our study demonstrates that this assumption is probably too optimistic.

Grist also posted a story on the study with the great title, ‘Trees are fed up with our carbon, refuse to grow faster.’

Not sure if there’s been a study done on it yet, but we also shouldn’t hope for a new planet á là the regressive and seriously lame Interstellar.

 

 

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Filed under Biiotechnology, Commodification of Life, Corporate Globalization, False Solutions to Climate Change, Food Sovereignty, GMOs, Industrial agriculture, Monsanto

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Filed under Biiotechnology, Commodification of Life, Corporate Globalization, False Solutions to Climate Change, Food Sovereignty, GMOs, Industrial agriculture, Monsanto

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Filed under Biiotechnology, Commodification of Life, Corporate Globalization, False Solutions to Climate Change, Food Sovereignty, GMOs, Industrial agriculture, Monsanto

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